Health Sciences

Overview of Health Sciences Pathway

The Health and Bioscience Pathway is a sequence of courses, which follows a hands-on, real-world problem-solving approach to learning. Students explore the concepts of human medicine and are introduced to topics such as physiology, genetics, microbiology and public health.

Pathway Lead:

Sharon Bachman
(513) 363-7400

Activities/Experiences

Through activities, like dissecting a heart and cow's eye, using Vernier Probes, model building, computer simulation, and other lab activities students examine the processes, structures and interactions of the human body – often playing the role of biomedical professionals; Health Science students dissect a cow's eyestudents also explore the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease, working collaboratively to investigate and design innovative solutions to the health challenges of the 21st century such as fighting cancer with nanotechnology. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal manikin, work through interesting real world cases and play the roles of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries. Students explore how to prevent and fight infection; screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; prevent, diagnose and treat cancer; and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail.

Students complete job shadows and an intense two week internship in the health field and have the opportunity to interact with students and staff from the University of Cincinnati's College of Allied Health and Christ Hospitals College of Nursing and Health Sciences. In their Senior year, they have the opportunity to work on an independent project with a mentor or advisor from a university, hospital, research institution, or the biomedical industry.

 

Course Descriptions

Principles of the Biomedical Sciences (PBS)

Students investigate various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. They determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person, and investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, medicine, and research processes. This course provides an overview of all the courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and lay the scientific foundation for subsequent courses. This course is designed for 9th or 10th grade students.

Health Sciences Pathway Intersession MRI demonstrationHuman Body Systems (HBS)

Students examine the interactions of human body systems as they explore identity, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Students design experiments, investigate the structures and functions of the human body, and use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal manikin, work through interesting real world cases and often play the roles of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries. This course is designed for 10th, 11th or 12th grade students.

Medical Interventions (MI)

Students investigate a variety of interventions involved in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease as they follow the life of a fictitious family. The course is a “How-To” manual for maintaining overall health and homeostasis in the body. Students explore how to prevent and fight infection; screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; prevent, diagnose and treat cancer; and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Through these scenarios, students are exposed to a range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics. This course is designed for 11th or 12th grade students.

Biomedical Innovation (BI) (Capstone Course)

Students design innovative solutions for the health challenges of the 21st century. They work through progressively challenging open-ended problems, addressing topics such as clinical medicine, physiology, biomedical engineering, and public health. They have the opportunity to work on an independent project with a mentor or advisor from a university, hospital, research institution, or the biomedical industry. Throughout the course, students are expected to present their work to an audience of STEM professionals. This course is designed for 12th grade students.

Human Anatomy and Physiology

The student will study the structure and function of the human body.  Topics to be discussed are orientation to anatomy and physiology, cellular function, tissues, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, action of nerve cells, central, peripheral and autonomic nervous systems, and special senses.

Medical Terminology

Medical terminology is the language used in health career pathways. The basic framework focuses on the different components of a medical term by learning the prefix, root word and/or suffix.  This course focuses on the applications of the rules for constructing and defining medical terms with an emphasis on building a working medical vocabulary. Topics include using the appropriate abbreviations and symbols for anatomical, physiological and pathological classifications and the associated medical specialties and procedures. Students will decipher medical terms by identifying and using word elements with an emphasis on derivation, meaning, and pronunciation. Further, students will interpret and translate medical records and documents.

 

CertificationsHealth Science Internship student performing CPR

  • OSHA 10-Hour General Industry, Safety and Health Certification
  • CPR/First Aid

College Credits: Duel Enrollment, cTag and AP Courses Offered

  • Bio 151 Anatomy and Physiology 1
  • Bio 152 Anatomy and Physiology 2
  • Medical Terminology
  • AP Statistics
  • AP Human Geography
  • English Composition 101
  • English Composition 103

 

Career Tech Student Organization

 

Pathway Skills Gained

  • Throughout Biomedical Sciences, students acquire strong teamwork and communication practices, and develop organizational, critical-thinking, and problem-solving skills.

In addition, students gain workplace skills in:

  • laboratory techniques
  • experimental design process
  • engineering design process
  • data collection and analysis
  • statistical analysis
  • computer skills
  • PCR and DNA Analysis

Examples of Career Opportunities

  • Emergency Medical technician
  • Crime Scene Investigator
  • DNA Analyst
  • Medical Examiner
  • Toxicologist
  • Biochemist
  • Food Scientist Technologist
  • Nutritionist/ Dietician
  • Endocrinologist
  • Primary Care Physician
  • Certified Diabetic Educator
  • Ophthalmologist
  • Clinical Researcher
  • Psychologist/ Psychiatrist
  • Molecular biologist,
  • Clinical geneticist
  • Cardiologist
  • Clinical Lab Technician
  • Medical laboratory technician
  • Microbiologist
  • Nurse
  • Speech Pathologist
  • Physical Therapist
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Audiologist
  • Radiologist
  • Genetics Counselor
  • Hematologist
  • Phlebotomist
  • Surgeon
  • Oncologist